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Talk To Frank

What Is Talk To Frank?

Talk To Frank is an anti-drugs campaign in the United Kingdom that has been running for the longest time. Yet, has it halted anybody taking drugs?

Ten years prior a police Swat group collided with a calm suburban kitchen and transformed the substance of medication education in the UK until the end of time. People were seriously warned to stay away from the drug peddlers around sports arenas and that they could be destroyed by drugs. A sort of comedy was also brought into the message in the bid to pass it appropriately.


In the first ad, a mother suggests to her teenage son that they have a chat about drugs so he calls the police snatch squad. There was also a new message: Drugs are illegal. Talking about the isn't. So talk to Frank."


Frank: Friendly Confidential Drug Advice

One can actually say that Frank which was a brain child of "Mother" ad firm became the new National Drugs Helpline It was supposed to be the symbol of a reliable older brother that younger individuals can go to for guidance regarding illegal substances. The quests of Pablo, the dog that's used as a substance mule, to a tour around a brain warehouse have been put forward under the Frank name, making it a well-known trade name amongst the youth of the nation.


According to Justin Tindall, creative director of Leo Burnett ad agency, the most important thing is that no one could accuse frank of trying to be "down with the kids," or coming out with the wrong attire. Many people have high regard for the YouTube spoof videos of Frank too. There's also no indication that Frank is working for the government, which is unusual for a government funded campaign.

Education about drug has come a long way since Nancy Reagan and the UK cast of Grange Hill told kids to "Just Say No," which a lot of people not believe was completely counterproductive.


The majority of the advertisements in Europe currently concentrate, like Frank, on attempting to share objective info to assist youngsters to make their own choices. In some places where there are still tough penalties for possession, ads showing prison bars or disappointed parents are still the norm. A recent campaign launched in Singapore informed young people who visit clubs, "You play, you pay".

In the UK, the government has burned through millions on Above the Influence, a long-running movement that urges positive contrasting options to drug usage utilizing a blend of amusement and useful examples. The stress is on chatting to youngsters by using their language - one advertisement depicts a group of "stoners" forsaken on a couch. Around the world, a good number of anti-drug campaigns still use the scare tricks of old, "descent into hell," being one of the most used. A good example is a Canadian commercial that appeared recently and formed part of the DrugsNot4Me series in which a beautiful, self-assured young woman changes into a trembling, hollow-eyed skeleton because of "drugs".

According to studies into a United States anti-drugs campaign between 1999 and 2004, advertisements showing the undesirable effects of substance abuse can frequently urge younger people who are marginalised to experiment with substances.


The opposition Conservative politicians were initially against Frank, simply because it pointed out the ups and downs of drug use, but it made giant strides.


"Cocaine makes you feel on top of the world" was used in one of the early internet ad campaigns.

Hitting the middle road with an ad to give the right message always proved to be a challenge. Matt Powell was the creative director of digital agency Profero, the company that came up with the cocaine ad; he now thinks he miscalculated the time an average user spends on browsing the internet. There will be many who could not have seen the adverse effects of the drugs at the end of the animation. Establishing the integrity of the Frank brand by telling the youth the truth about drugs and their effects was the ultimate aim of the ad, Powell states.

According to the Home Office, 67% of younger people in a survey stated that they would ask Frank if they required advice on drugs. 225,892 calls were made to the Frank helpline and 3,341,777 visits to the site in 2011/12. For him, this shows that the campaign is very successful.

However, just like every other anti-drugs campaign in the world , there's no evidence that Frank has actually stopped people from taking drugs.

More than 9% drop has been witnessed in the country since the campaign came into place, but a drop in the use of cannabis has been given as an explanation for this, probably because teenagers are changing their approach towards tobacco smoking.


What Is Frank?

FRANK is a state drug education services together settled by the by the Department of Health and Home Office of the British government in 2003. It was designed to lower the rate of both legal and illegal drug use by providing education to teenagers and young people about what the effects of using drug and alcohol could be. Several media campaigns on the web and on radio have been put out by this programme.


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Services

FRANK gives the accompanying services to individuals who look for data and/or advice regarding drugs:

  • The FRANK website
  • A confidential telephone number, available 24 hours a day
  • Email
  • A classified live chat facility, accessible from 2pm-6pm everyday
  • A service to help find appropriate counselling or treatment